8:45

Welcome from the morning Chair

Prof. Brian Ó Gallachóir

Prof. Brian Ó Gallachóir

Director, SFI MaREI Research Centre for Energy, Climate and Marine

8:50

MINISTERIAL ADDRESS:

Ireland’s journey to 70% of electricity being generated from renewables by 2030.

Minister Seán Canney

Minister Seán Canney

Minister of State at the Department of Rural and Community Development and the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment

TRANSFORMING OUR ENERY SECTOR

9:05

OPENING ADDRESS: Achieving the energy transition

Over the past two centuries, societies have gone through energy transitions resulting from a combination of technological, economic, and political changes. The move from wood and peat to coal in the 19th century was due to the invention of the steam engine, and coal remained the primary fuel used globally until the middle of the 20th century. The next major transition occurred with the adoption and growth of electrification and the internal combustion engine in the early 20th century resulting in half of the world’s primary energy demand being met through oil and natural gas. Today’s energy transition is also influenced by technological, economic, and political factors, but it is the first being driven primarily by environmental factors based on changing social values – the drive to reduce global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Transforming the energy sector to zero-carbon by 2050 is challenging and ultimate success will depend on citizen participation, consumer response and behavioral change. Every energy transition has had its winners and its losers, both economically and in terms of social justice and community cohesion. The current transition is no different. So what will it mean for you?

Marie Donnelly

Marie Donnelly

Chairperson, Renewable Energy Ireland (Former Director for Renewable, Energy Efficiency and Innovation at the Directorate General for Energy of the European Commission)

9:20

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: The post-liberalised electricity market

Over the past two centuries, societies have gone through energy transitions resulting from a combination of technological, economic, and political changes. The move from wood and peat to coal in the 19th century was due to the invention of the steam engine, and coal remained the primary fuel used globally until the middle of the 20th century. The next major transition occurred with the adoption and growth of electrification and the internal combustion engine in the early 20th century resulting in half of the world’s primary energy demand being met through oil and natural gas. Today’s energy transition is also influenced by technological, economic, and political factors, but it is the first being driven primarily by environmental factors based on changing social values – the drive to reduce global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Transforming the energy sector to zero-carbon by 2050 is challenging and ultimate success will depend on citizen participation, consumer response and behavioral change. Every energy transition has had its winners and its losers, both economically and in terms of social justice and community cohesion. The current transition is no different. So what will it mean for you?

Professor Derek Bunn

Professor Derek Bunn

London Business School

9:35

PANEL DISCUSSION: What is Ireland’s energy future?

  • Energy supply and demand trends in Ireland
  • Challenges and opportunities for future energy policy in light of Brexit
  • Energy security in an Irish context
  • The wider implications of climate targets
Roisin Cullinan

Roisin Cullinan

Network and Emergency Planning Manager, CRU (Commission for Regulation of Utilities)

Marie Donnelly

Marie Donnelly

Chairperson, Renewables Energy Ireland (former Director for Renewables, Energy Efficiency and Innovation at the Directorate General for Energy of the European Commission)

Muireann Lynch

Muireann Lynch

Research Officer, Economic and Social Research Institute

Dr. Matt Kennedy

Dr. Matt Kennedy

Head of Strategy and Business, International Energy Research Centre, Tyndall

10:10

Moving Ireland towards a cleaner energy future

Brian Mullins

Brian Mullins

Head of Regulatory Affairs, Gas Networks Ireland

10:30

Morning Break

ENHANCED INTERCONNECTION

10:55

PANEL DISCUSSION: Integration of renewable energy systems in Ireland

The integration of more variable renewable forms of generation on the power system means transmission operators must consider an additional complex range of demand and supply issues. These include the operational challenges of switching to more variable non-synchronous generation sources, security of supply in terms of managing an increasing variety of generation technology types and the integration and use of Smart Grid technologies allowing greater user participation in the power system.

  • Will renewables and gas be enough?
  • Combined heat and power
  • Microgeneration
Ivan Codd

Ivan Codd

Project Manager, ESB Networks

Andy Kelly

Andy Kelly

Senior Principal Consultant, AFRY Management Consulting

Jim Scheer

Jim Scheer

Head of Low Carbon Technologies, SEAI (Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland)

Denis Duff

Denis Duff

Better Environment with Nuclear Energy

Fran McFadden

Fran McFadden

National Customer Acquisition Manager, Gas Networks Ireland

11:35

Celtic Interconnector – Interconnection project between France and Ireland

The European Commission will fund over half of the €1 billion Celtic interconnector which will connect Ireland’s electricity network to France. The project, which is expected to take ten years to complete, will involve an underwater connection across the Irish Sea to the North West coast of France. The interconnector will be the first directly connecting Ireland to the European mainland, and the first with no link to Britain. It will be received as an important piece of infrastructure to protect security of supply for Ireland in a post-Brexit scenario.

Michael Mahon

Michael Mahon

Director of Grid Development & Interconnection, EirGrid

11:55

Winds of change

  • Offshore Wind: Large-scale sustainable power for Ireland
  •  The offshore wind industry in Ireland and its role in the future energy mix
Peter Lefroy

Peter Lefroy

Project Director, Dublin Array Offshore Wind Farm

INTELLIGENT STORAGE

12:10

Far more cooperation between public and private stakeholders in the energy sector is needed to achieve Ireland’s CO2 targets. Sector coupling – the interaction between energy suppliers and their consumers plus the integration of renewables – is a viable and feasible way to reduce CO2 emissions and improve the decarbonization process at large scale. However, this requires innovative and sustainable solutions and technology, capable of providing sufficient energy supply in the form of heat, cold and electricity, respectively energy storage.

 

  • Energy storage technologies
  • What is intelligent storage?
  • Understanding the smart energy consumer
Raymond C. Decorvet

Raymond C. Decorvet

Senior Account Executive, MAN Energy Solutions

EMPOWERING THE CUSTOMER

12:15

Powering up the customer experience

  • Showing how new business models and strategic partnerships between multiple stakeholders in the energy sector are needed to deliver innovative propositions which are of real interest to customers / home owners
  • Demonstrating how Smart Electric Thermal Storage (SETS) can provide benefits to the electricity grid and wider energy ecosystem and also satisfy all customer needs in terms of cost, control and comfort.
  • Explaining how the end customer has been at the heart of the design and development of the customer journey
Neil Naughton

Neil Naughton

Executive Chairman, Glen Dimplex

12:40

Lunch

1:45

Welcome back from the chair

Professor Andrew Keane

Professor Andrew Keane

Director, Energy Institute, University College Dublin

DIGITALISATION OF THE ENERGY SYSTEM

1:50

Digital grids and markets – the impact of emerging and disruptive technologies

  • As a new energy system approaches, who will be the winners and losers?
  • How enabling and disruptive technologies are impacting the electricity system
  • Enabling versus disruption
  • When to invest in disruption
Sean Casey

Sean Casey

Head of Energy and Assets, EY

2:10

PANEL DISCUSSION: Digitalising across the board to create a better tomorrow

  • How new technology has the potential to transform power generation and distribution
  • What are the key priorities for the industry in the face of a challenging future?
  • How can digitisation support the transition to a lower carbon economy?
  • Developing a new strategy to take advantage of the opportunities new energy presents
  • Digitalising processes and products to meet customers’ expectations
David McAuley

David McAuley

Founder & CEO, Bitpower

Paddy Finn

Paddy Finn

Managing Director, Electricity Exchange

Dr Piyush Verma

Dr Piyush Verma

Senior Energy Market Analyst, IERC – International Energy Research Centre

Dr. Barry Hayes

Dr. Barry Hayes

School of Engineering, University College Cork

3:00

INTELLIGENT STORAGE AND RELIABILTIY

Far more cooperation between public and private stakeholders in the energy sector is needed to achieve Ireland’s CO2 targets. Sector coupling – the interaction between energy suppliers and their consumers plus the integration of renewables – is a viable and feasible way to reduce CO2 emissions and improve the decarbonization process at large scale. However, this requires innovative and sustainable solutions and technology, capable of providing sufficient energy supply in the form of heat, cold and electricity, respectively energy storage.

 

  • Energy storage technologies
  • What is intelligent storage?
  • Understanding the smart energy consumer
Magnus Hall

Magnus Hall

CEO, Eurelectric

3:30

LOCKNOTE ADDRESS: Power system reliability in an environment of increased inter-connectivity with HVDC (grids)

Developments of the last decades have made the operation of power systems increasingly international, with large cross-border energy exchanges. This has helped in integrating renewable energy sources and realize the liberalization of the energy systems in Europe. High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) as a technology is seen as an enabler in this, as it offers cost-effective solutions for long distance, high power transmission of electricity and allows the connection of multiple synchronous zones. With the deployment of renewable energy sources, and in particular offshore wind, the role of HVDC will further increase in the next decades. In particular voltage source converter HVDC is attracting a lot of attention due to its additional flexibility and the ability to connect offshore wind. (VSC) HVDC has the advantage of offering full control of active power (and reactive) power. Furthermore, they connect different systems, allowing energy and services to be exchanged. The result is an hybrid AC/DC system, where different AC systems are strongly interconnected using HVDC. This presentation will focus on the operation of hybrid AC/DC systems: systems with many DC links or systems where a DC overlay grid interconnects the AC power systems, and in particularly on the reliability of such hybrid systems.

Dirk Van Hertem

Dirk Van Hertem

Professor, KU Leuven, Belgium

4:00

Conference Close